A Diplomatic Solution to the Spratlys Dispute- The Filipino Way

18 Jun

The Philippines first took claim of the then called Kalayaan Group of Islands in 1956. Two decades later, it was discovered that the place was rich in oil and natural gases. Ever since then, disputes over what we now know as Spratlys Islands heated.

Among all the Nations vying over the potentially wealthy islands, China and Vietnam had contested over it on several occasions resulting in sunken ships and countless deaths. Both claim historical rights over Spratlys dating who knows when.

Now, the Philippines is taking a stand. After all, based on the international convention on the laws of the sea, the country has rightful claim over Spratlys Islands. What can a poor country with scarcely enough resources on its own take on a super power nation whose economy is closely linked to its own?

The solution, a diplomatic ‘talk’ between two the two countries the way the Greeks did in ancient times.

In the Trojan war, the battle waged endlessly for several years. One day, Achilles stood up and challenged Hector to a battle which would ultimately change the course of the Trojan war.

Fighting for the Philippines would be Sarangani Province Representative and Pound per Pound Boxing King, Manny ‘Pacman’ Pacquiao.

For China, fighting would be Hong Kong’s cheeky, lovable and best known film star, Jackie Chan.

Jet Li who’s a Wushu (a martial art) national champion in China several times would have been a better contender but he gained Singaporean citizenship in 2009. And Singapore is apparently not part of China.

The stage will be on neutral grounds, preferably on an Asian country that is not part of the dispute over Spratlys. Indonesia fits the criteria well. Although they had a history concerning an incident race killing off some Chinese in the past, that can be easily overlooked.

It will be broad casted all over the world, in all the major channels. No advertisements are allowed though, people might grow to an even fiercer rage. Who knows what people might do during a commercial break.

The fight will only last for 12 rounds with 3 mins each round and should not reach dawn. The Chinese have reputations for fighting from dusk until dawn like in the movies. It would be unfair for Pacquiao since his schedule is booked with Congressional meetings, tv shows and commercial shootings.

Both fighters will be fighting in hand to hand combat. Considering both fighters are masters of their own fighting style, this won’t be much of a matter. Gloves and protective gear are optional but they shouldn’t be made out of anything hard and heavy.

Standard boxing rules apply except for the ‘no hitting below the belt’ rule. This may be a disadvantage for Pacquiao but if he lands a solid blow below the belt, it could also be devastating.

No acrobatics is allowed. Jumping no higher than shoulder height is allowed. Pacquiao does have killer footwork but what will it do if Jackie Chan is able to leap high up in the air and do an awesome acrobatic attack.

Though the fight between Achilles and Hector was one sided (with Achilles being invincible and all) and it ended brutally, and it didn’t really stop the trojan war, it made for great entertainment. Imagine the thrill of the soldiers of both sides who witnessed the epic face-off.

Not that anyone wishes to see bloody ending. An even more epic fight between Manny Pacquiao and Jackie Chan would, in a way, decrease tension between the two partner nations especially after the fight when both fighters hold each others’ hand high up above the air regardless of the bloodshed to exemplify camaraderie and friendship.

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4 Responses to “A Diplomatic Solution to the Spratlys Dispute- The Filipino Way”

  1. Anonymous 09/15/2011 at 6:40 am #

    I love this Blog! :)

    • Isko 09/18/2011 at 2:59 pm #

      This blog loves you too :D

  2. Nelly 02/06/2012 at 9:22 am #

    Great article as always. :)

    • Isko 02/06/2012 at 12:52 pm #

      Thanks!

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